Vintage & General Cycling Articles

Don't ditch the dork disc

Don't ditch the dork disc

The dork disc is a term I'd never heard until recently. Normally, it's referred to as a spoke protector or freewheel guard. Essentially it is the plastic or metal disc that sits between your cassette or freewheel and the spokes on the drive side of your rear wheel. The function of this disc is to protect your spokes; should the chain slip off the largest sprocket and into the wheel. The general view is that these discs are normally found on cheaper lower end bikes, and having one on your bike is not cool. The reasons for this seem to...

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Read this if you think you don't need a cotter press.

Read this if you think you don't need a cotter press.

It's fair to say cotter pins became obsolete for a reason, they are less reliable than the cotterless bolt on cranks that replaced them. But they do look stylish, and they won't disappear off the face of the earth anytime soon. In short, traditional cranks have a hole through them to fit a cotter pin. The spindle has a notch cut out at each end to accommodate the pins, when the pins are in position they hold the cranks in place against the spindle. The pins are an interference fit and also have a threaded end with a washer and...

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8 Reasons Why Single Speed is On Trend

8 Reasons Why Single Speed is On Trend

Take a look at the bike parking areas in most cities and you may start to spot a theme. Lots of vintage steel frames converted to single speed or fixie bikes. These are not so much your track builds (though you will see them around) most either have flip flop hubs, a single speed freewheel or a standard free hub converted with big spacers to run a single cog, rather than true fixed. The lumpy bumpy public roads are not exactly similar to a velodrome and the bikes reflect that. But why has not having gears become such a big...

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Replacing Vintage 27" wheels with 700c

Replacing Vintage 27" wheels with 700c

Many older vintage road bike frames (made up until around the late 1980's) were built to use  27" x 1 1/4" sized wheels. Plenty of them are still going strong today. However, to keep these vintage bikes in regular use, owners often need to change to the more modern 700c size. This seems mainly due to the far wider choice of readily available wheels and tyres. Hub spacing can be an issue, 700c wheels tend to be built for a frame rear dropout spacing of anything from 126mm to 135mm. The older frames built for use with 27" x 1...

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How to Clean a Vintage Steel Bike Frame

How to Clean a Vintage Steel Bike Frame

You will need a bucket, some small wire and nylon brushes, green scourers, headset spanner(s), headset bearings, bottom bracket taps (optional), car or bike shampoo, warm water, car or bike wax/polish, a sponge, lint free cloths. Wear protective gloves throughout the process. If you are working on a frame on it's own you can start by removing the fork, but if you are working on a complete bike then you absolutely must remove all components and cables. This includes the handlebars, stem - literally everything including the bottom bracket. You can leave the headset cups in place, but to do...

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